University of Alaska Fairbanks logo bear University of Alaska Fairbanks

A comprehensive characterization of the Tanana River at Nenana is available at the following AHERC report: Characterization of the Tanana River at Nenana, Alaska, to Determine the Important Factors Affecting Site Selection, Deployment, and Operation of Hydrokinetic Devices to Generate Power.

 

River Discharge for the Open Water Season: The average, maximum, and minimum discharge for the Tanana River at Nenana is shown in the following plot. The minimum discharge year occurred in 1996, and the maximum average discharge year occurred in 1967. Discharge data can be accessed from the USGS gauging station at the Tanana River near Nenana.

 Originaltanana Discharge

Source: USGS data available at: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/inventory/?site_no=15515500.

 


 

River Stage for the Open Water Season: Correlated to the USGS average, maximum, and minimum measured discharge.

F Tanana_Stage.jpg

Source: From USGS data available at: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/inventory/?site_no=15515500.

 


 

Average Flow for the Open Water Season: An estimation of the seasonal variation of river current velocity is obtained by entering the measured seasonal discharge into a 2D hydrodynamics model for the TRTS.

F Tanana_Velocities.jpg

Source: Modeled velocities from Duvoy, P., & Toniolo, H. (2012). HYDROKAL: a module for in-stream hydrokinetic resource assessment. Computers & Geosciences, 39, 171-181.

 


 

Wintertime Conditions:  Maximum current velocities around 0.5 m/s were measured during winter which are insufficient to produce economic power from HKDs in addition to the possibility of HKD infrastructure being damaged by ice in spring.

F Tanana_Winter_Velocities.jpg

Source: Johnson, J., Toniolo, H., Seitz, A., Schmid, J., & Duvoy, P. (2013). Characterization of the Tanana River at Nenana, Alaska, to Determine the Important Factors Affecting Site Selection, Deployment, and Operation of Hydrokinetic Devices to Generate Power. Alaska Center for Energy and Power, Alaska Hydrokinetic Energy Research Center: Fairbanks, AK, USA, 130.

 


 

Exceedance Plot for the Open Water Season: Percentage of time that river flow is likely to equal or exceed some velocity of interest.

F Exceedance Plot.jpg

Source: Modeled velocities from Duvoy, P., & Toniolo, H. (2012). HYDROKAL: a module for in-stream hydrokinetic resource assessment. Computers & Geosciences, 39, 171-181.
Discharge data from USGS at: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/inventory/?site_no=15515500

 


 

River Debris and Stage: Debris Index (DI) was obtained by counting the number of individual pieces of woody debris crossing a transect across the river in a five-minute period. Most debris is flushed as the stage river increases immediately after May breakup.

F Debris Index & Stage vs Time (2011).jpg

Source: Johnson, J. B., Schmid, J., Kasper, J., Seitz, A. C., & Duvoy, P. (2014). Protection of In-River Hydrokinetic Power-Generating Devices from Surface Debris in Alaskan Rivers. Fairbanks, Alaska,University of Alaska, Fairbanks: 61

 


 

Bathymetry: Image of the bathymetric survey conducted by Terrasond in 2009.

Bathymetry

Source: Image from Google Earth. Bathymetry from Terrasond (2010). Nenana Hydrokinetic Energy Research Site Physical Characterization Survey.

 


 

Power Density: Power density as a function of location in the Tanana River Test Site river reach, with notations about turbulence and placement of hydrokinetic power generating devices.

Power Density

Source: Figure modified from Duvoy, P., & Toniolo, H. (2012). HYDROKAL: a module for in-stream hydrokinetic resource assessment. Computers & Geosciences, 39, 171-181.